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29 sailors aboard Russian vessel Yantarnyy test positive for COVID-19

Image credits: Sverri Egholm
Image credits: Sverri Egholm

No COVID-19 cases have been registered on Faroese soil for the past three days. However, several cases have been confirmed aboard the Russian trawler Yantarnyy, which is currently docked in Kollafjørður.

Yantarnyy was docked in Klaksvík in July along with Russian trawler Karelia and Lithuanian vessel Cassiopea. Aboard Karelia, 23 crew members tested positive for COVID-19, and two of them were hospitalized at the National Hospital. 11 crew members tested positive aboard Cassipea, but the Yantarnyy declined the offer of testing.

But this time the vessel notified Faroese authorities that two crew members had symptoms of COVID-19, hence all 77 crew members were tested and 29 tested positive. The two crew members are now hospitalized at the National Hospital.

The rest of the crew are still aboard the vessel, where they have been instructed to stay.

410 cases have now been confirmed in the Faroe Islands, and 337 have recovered, meaning the country currently has 73 active cases.

A total of five people are currently hospitalized, and the two Russian sailors are currently in the intensive care unit on ventilators. The plan is to move them to Denmark for further treatment.

Situation is under control

On Thursday, chief medical officer, Lars Fodgaard Møller warned that the corona virus was still on the loose in society, and that it was not under control.

The reason was that three people had tested positive the previous day, who had no idea how they could have contracted the virus, as they had no known connection to any other infected person.

However, this turned out to be a mistake.

As the Ministry of Health announced on Sunday, three samples were reanalyzed, and it turned out that they were false positives. Hence the total number of confirmed cases was lowered by three.

After talking to the three people in question, Lars Fodgaard Møller started to suspect that something was amiss.

– If you haven’t been in contact with a known source of infection, have no symptoms and can’t at all understand how you can have contracted the virus, I choose to retest people, he told Kringvarp Føroya.

Because of this new development, he thinks the situation might be under control after all.

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