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Light at the end of the tunnel: Final blast of Eysturoyartunnil puts end in sight

Work on the sub-sea tunnel connecting two of the Faroe Islands’ largest islands is progressing well. In early June, the final blast of rock took place, providing an open passage from one end to the other. The 11.25km tunnel, called Eysturoyartunnil (Eystur tunnel), will be the islands’ nineteenth tunnel and the longest one in the country.

The Eysturoyartunnil will connect Hvítanes on the island of Streymoy with two villages (Strendur and Runavík) on each side of Skálafjørður bay with a sub-sea roundabout. It will shorten the travel distance from Tórshavn, the capital, to Strendur/Runavík from 55km to 17km, saving around 50 minutes. The drive from Tórshavn to the country’s second largest city, Klaksvík, will be shortened by half an hour.

The tunnel is constructed by the public limited company Eystur- og Sandoyartunlar. The tunnel is the largest single investment ever made in the Faroe Islands, totalling at around 260m Euros (including another sub-sea tunnel to the island of Sandoy. Work on this tunnel will begin later in 2019).

The aim of the Eysturoytunnil is to create new business opportunities and to shorten time spent travelling. The tunnel has already affected local communities by increasing interest in real estate in villages on Eysturoy island.

The tunnel will be funded by a toll fee (a system that the other two sub-sea tunnels in the country have used to good effect). The price has not been set but is estimated to be around DKK75 per car per trip (toll payment is only taken one way).

Words: Levi Hanssen
Picture: Teitur Samuelsen, CEO Eystur- og Sandoyartunlar and Heðin Mortensen, Minister of Infrastructure.

This article was originally published on: Faroeislands.fo

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